newrez - Increase Screen Rez For Netbook

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 146 comments

I am not sure what you mean...

Are you suggesting that changing the font and DPI is another way to change the screen resolution?

Or you asking if there is a way to change the "newrez-v" aspect ratio?

If it is the second item, just edit the newrez-v script and replace "1280x800" with whatever you would like.

Otherwise, please explain again. - Jan 11 2012
newrez - Increase Screen Rez For Netbook

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 146 comments

There is a problem with the newest XRandR. The screen properly resizes, but the mouse is not informed of the larger area. So if you resize a 1024x600 screen to 1280x800, the mouse is confined within an invisible border at 1024x600.

However, I found a functional (though not perfect) work-around for this. When you unpack 'newrez' it will provide two scripts.

The first script, based on XRandR, will not work properly in Gnome3 until the above bug is fixed.

The second script works differently. Instead of resizing the current screen, it creates a VNC Server session on port 5999 at 1280x800 and then executes a VNC Viewer on that port in 'scaled mode'. This is slightly slower, noticeable mostly when viewing videos, but DOES succeed in giving you more space.

This second script is named "newrez-v". Please run it from a command line, because it does not (yet) have a GUI. You can edit the script directly to change the resolution of the VNC session. The next version will be more elegant.

-- Marc - Jan 11 2012
Audio/Video/Image/Text/ISO Convert

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 380 comments

The issue in this thread is now fixed in 0.97

Situation was that in SOME distros, libtranslate installs /usr/bin/translate. In OTHER distros, libtranslate installs /usr/bin/translate-bin (and /usr/bin/translate can be something ELSE).

This is now handled properly. - Jan 08 2012
Audio/Video/Image/Text/ISO Convert

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 380 comments

OK, here's a guess. What is the default language setting in Gnome on your system? What do you get when you type: echo $LANG - Jan 05 2012
Audio/Video/Image/Text/ISO Convert

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 380 comments

Let's first make sure that the file downloaded to your system is correct. cd to the nautilus-scripts directory and type: sum avconvert

It should respond with: 48394 73 - Jan 05 2012
Audio/Video/Image/Text/ISO Convert

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 380 comments

OOPS!

There was a typo in a last-minute change. 0.96 fixes this. - Jan 04 2012
newrez - Increase Screen Rez For Netbook

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 146 comments

There's the answer then. It doesn't yet use the GUI (with zenity) to send messages. If you'd started it in gnome-terminal you would have gotten the messages. I'll add that.

Glad it's working now. Seems xrandr 1.3 has a bug that's been there for a while now, plus the xrandr newrez will never work for some video drivers. So this newrez version will be useful until those things get fixed in the repos. - Jan 02 2012
newrez - Increase Screen Rez For Netbook

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 146 comments

Yes, it dows run gnome2. Apparently because VNC server isn't actually a 'video card'.

As for the dependency checks, you did run this from a terminal session, right? Not by just double-clicking? - Jan 02 2012
newrez - Increase Screen Rez For Netbook

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 146 comments

Guess I was too anxious to get it posted :-)

The script now does a dependency check. Please re-download and try again. LET ME KNOW!! - Jan 02 2012
Audio/Video/Image/Text/ISO Convert

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 380 comments

I should also say that these are actually four DIFFERENT ways to install and use avconvert. You can do ONE of them, SOME of them, or ALL of them. Each one will give you a working installation. These are just different ways of launching the program. - Jan 01 2012
Audio/Video/Image/Text/ISO Convert

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 380 comments

Not difficult...

(3) do #2, then add it as a nautilus-action (set "paramater" to "%M", check "multiple files")

With nautilus scripts, you right-click and go to scripts to find your application. With "nautilus-actions", your application shows up directly in the right-click list. To set up a nautilus-action, you must first install the "nautilus-actions" package. Then run "Nautilus Actions Configuration". In that configuration you are able to specify an icon, the path to the executable, the parameters to pass to the program, and conditions when the action should appear (and not appear) in the list.


(4) add it to Gnome panel/launch-bar (drag/drop or right-click panel Add/Custom-Application)

Click-and-drag the "avconvert" icon to the Gnome Panel (top or bottom bar), or right-click the panel and then click "add custom application". Either way you can assign an icon and label through 'properties'. Once you've done this, you can now click-to-launch, or you can seelect/drag/drop files onto the icon to launch it.

Have fun!!!

-- Marc - Jan 01 2012
Audio/Video/Image/Text/ISO Convert

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 380 comments

FIXED!

Now using the built-in libtranslate. This seems perhaps a bit slower, but it works well. - Dec 28 2011
Audio/Video/Image/Text/ISO Convert

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 380 comments

OH!!
Google Translate is now a PAID SERVICE!!!!

I must find another way to offer other languages. More news as soon as I find something. - Dec 28 2011
Audio/Video/Image/Text/ISO Convert

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 380 comments

Spaces in files and paths are definitely allowed, so this issue must be related to how "avconvert" is being invoked.

If executed as a Nautilus-action or as a Nautilus-script, then nautilus itself is supposed to be quoting the pathname(s) to your selected icon(s). The same is true if you dragged the script to your Gnome launcher panel and then drag&drop files onto it.

If you are executing avconvert from within a script of your own, or from the command line directly, then you must quote the spaces (and possibly other characters) yourself. Either enclose the entire path in quotes, or preceed each space with a backslash.

If I haven't covered the launch method you're using, or if you're using one of these and it still isn't working, send me another message. It 'should' work! - Nov 21 2011
Audio/Video/Image/Text/ISO Convert

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 380 comments

I suspect that you may be missing one of the gstreamer-plugin packages. When a conversion completes, there is always a text file created in /tmp with the details of what happened. Since you are converting videos, the file in /tmp will be named "ffmpeg-NNNNN" where NNNNN is a number (actually the PID of the process you ran).

So, run a conversion that fails and then check that file for details. If you like, attach that file to an email and send it to me at tsi-inc@comcast.net - Nov 21 2011
newrez - Increase Screen Rez For Netbook

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 146 comments

Hopefully... I am using Fedora, and have been having the mouse problem on my netbook since moving to release 15.

In my case, the screen resizes just fine, but the mouse is trapped in a 1024x600 area. Is that what you are getting now? I've found no cure yet.

-- Marc - Sep 17 2011
newrez - Increase Screen Rez For Netbook

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 146 comments

I didn't know about Ubuntu's 'blind spots'. On Fedora 15 my only issue is that the mouse can't escape a rectangle of the original resolution.

It appears that X sets the new resolution but doesn't tell Gnome 3 about it.

If setting 'panning' to the new resolution fixes an Ubuntu problem, I can certainly stick that in there. If while playing with this you happen upon a fix for the mouse, please let me know! - Sep 08 2011
Audio/Video/Image/Text/ISO Convert

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 380 comments

I'm not familiar with the MTS format. When you choose "defaults" in my script, it uses whatever defaults ffmpeg chooses for that conversion.

I would suggest performing a conversion, looking closely at the top of the window where the script shows you the parameters of the original file. Make note of video size, and of the video and audio bitrate, etc.

Then start the script on the file you just created. Compare the video and audio parameters you see to those from the original.

If the conversion has retained the same quality settings, then it is already optimal by default. However, if you see differences, send me a message with what has changed and I will help you get the right options set.

Once the right options have been found, they can be saved by the script for later use. I can also added them to the "user submissions" section for others to download when converting MTS files.

-- Marc - Sep 08 2011
newrez - Increase Screen Rez For Netbook

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 146 comments

I have a netbook I've upgraded to Gnome3. There seems to be something wrong with XrandR in this environment. I have tried, and while I have managed a resized screen that looks perfect, the mouse is not able to expend beyond the boundary of the original resolution. So after a resize from 1024x600 to 1280x800, the mouse cannot move outside of an invisible 1024x600 rectangle.

I've tried many things. Somehow it seems Gnome is not aware of the change in X. If anyone out there has an idea here, I'd sure like to hear it! :-)

At this time, I'm just (im)patiently waiting for an update that fixes this. - Sep 05 2011
newrez - Increase Screen Rez For Netbook

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 146 comments

Do not worry.

The newrez script does NOT try to force your display into an un-supported mode!!

Your actual hardware display stays at the original resolution (1024x600). The script creates a higher resolution "display" in memory ONLY. Then it shows that in-memory display on your actual screen by "scaling it down".

For example, if you have a physical screen that is 1024x600 and choose newrez to set your screen to 1280x800, it will show on your display a 1280x800 image that has been scaled-down by 25%.

There is NO DANGER in using this script. The resolution of your display actually stays unchanged. It simply scales everything to appear smaller, - Jul 27 2011
newrez - Increase Screen Rez For Netbook

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 146 comments

After the script has run, you will find two files in your $HOME directory. They will be named something like "newrez-1280.desktop" and "newrez-LVDS1-1280"

The first is a file which you can double-click (you might place it on your Desktop or launch bar). The second is a shell script that can be used in various ways.

One way to use the shell script is to add it to your 'Startup Applications'. This ensures that it is executed AFTER the desktop is running. If you find that it starts too soon, edit the file and add a "sleep XX" so that it waits for a few seconds before starting (XX might be just 2 or 3 seconds).

Please post your results here for other users to read.

Enjoy! - Jul 26 2011
Audio/Video/Image/Text/ISO Convert

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 380 comments

OOPS!!! Seems so... - Jul 10 2011
newrez - Increase Screen Rez For Netbook

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 146 comments

What video driver is your system using? Plus, I've not personally tried this in any sort of VM setup. What is the output of "xrandr"? - Jun 21 2011
newrez - Increase Screen Rez For Netbook

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 146 comments

Hi --

I use Fedora, and recently upgraded my own netbook from 14 to 15 (with Gnome 3). Newrez is confused by this upgrade as well, where I get a resized display but the mouse pointer is confined to a 1024x600 rectangle.

I don't yet know what changed: whether it's XrandR itself, something more fundamental in X, or something else.

Thanks for letting me know it's not just my system and not limited to Fedora. I'll get to work on it...

-- Marc - Jun 21 2011
Audio/Video/Image/Text/ISO Convert

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 380 comments

AH -- the "customization" comments at the end of the script have gotten old and out of date.

All the progress indicators are handled by a function in the script named avwatcher()
In the current version of the script you will find that on line 17. To shut it off completely, add an "exit 0" line somewhere between line 17 and line 22.

If you would like to instead retain the progress indicators for functions other than images, you can be more selective. Each routine launches the avwatcher() independently.

Line 613 is where the actual image-conversion gets executed, and you can see that 612 where avwatcher() is executed. If you simply comment that line (add a # at the start) then progress will be eliminated for this function but not for others.

Perhaps I should make this an option somewhere... - May 16 2011
Audio/Video/Image/Text/ISO Convert

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 380 comments

Newly added in 0.92

The system will check that "avimerge" is installed, and display a message if it is not found.

The "Merge AVI" function now writes any text output from avimerge, including errors, to /tmp/avimerge.$$

This should help! - May 05 2011
Audio/Video/Image/Text/ISO Convert

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 380 comments

1: Be sure that you have the program "avimerge" on your system (I did not yet add a test in the program to check for it). Just type "which avimerge" to check. If you do not have it, then install the package "transcode".

2: If "avimerge" is already installed, edit the script and go to line number 1637. On that line, you sill see ">/dev/null". Change that to ">/tmp/avimerge.txt". Run the conversion again and then look in that file to see any errors.

This definitely worked here. Let me know what you find out... - May 02 2011
Audio/Video/Image/Text/ISO Convert

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 380 comments

This will work on ANYTHING that has the dependencies installed (zenity, ffmpeg, etc). It is entirely bash shell script (you can even start it from the command line if unsure how to set it up in context menus).

That said, if you find a particular configuration in KDE that makes it nicely accessible then please let me know!

THANKS! - Apr 29 2011
Audio/Video/Image/Text/ISO Convert

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 380 comments

I am really not sure what you are asking.

This script does retain aspect ratios (unless you are asking for a way to stretch/squeeze the image). It also lets you choose a new size simply by specifying the longer side (and if what you want is not in the list, you can choose any size you want by clicking 'other'). And I'm unclear what resizing to inches or millimetres really means because the image size depends on the screen or paper it is shown on.

Or are you asking to be able to right-click a folder instead of on the contents of that folder? - Apr 29 2011
Audio/Video/Image/Text/ISO Convert

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 380 comments

I needed to post an update because of an error in the AVI merge function. The new function was being activated whenever multiple files of the same type were selected, even if they were not AVI. So it was a very minor fix.

You're right though, there have been many updates. The first version I posted here was 0.01 and I have changed it (mostly adding new functions) 90 times. Somewhere around version 35, I added that it should check the gnome-look site to see if there is a newer one and notify the user.

Personally I use Fedora, though I know that this script works on nearly everything. It is actually a shell script, so as long as its dependencies are installed it should continue to work on nearly any system regardless of the window manager.

I do like your idea of distributing it in a way that makes it easier for users to download and maintain. I will do some research on the ppa method.

Thanks! - Apr 29 2011
Audio/Video/Image/Text/ISO Convert

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 380 comments

The normal use of this script processes each file one at a time, in a loop. For example you could select a group of images that are a mixture of sizes, and even a mixture of file types (gif, , jpg, png, tiff), and convert all of them to a single size and format (perhaps 1280 pixel jpg).

In this new function of merging videos, the script needs to recognize that you have selected multiple AVI files and offer to merge them before entering the loop. This function is triggered whenever (and only) if you select more than one AVI file and that the selection includes only AVI files.

This merge will work properly only if all of the AVI files have the same video and audio properties (bit rate, number of channels, etc for audio / resolution, frame rate, etc for video).

If you aren't sure of the parameters, avconvert should first be used to convert all of the AVI files to be merged. This will ensure that the format is the same. If you want to merge files that are of other formats (wmv, flv, mp4, etc) then these must be converted to AVI files first.

To actually perform the merge of AVI files, simply select all of the files to be merged (drag-click, shift-click, or control-click) and then right-click and run avconvert. When avconvert is run on more than one AVI (and only AVI), the option to merge them will be offered.

The result of merging AVI files is a single output file named MergedAVI.avi which can be right-clicked and converted to a different format.

So, if you have two AVI files and you want to create a single mp4 there are two or three steps involved:

Step 1, which may not be needed: if the source AVI files are not the same format, use avconvert to process both files in the same way so that they ARE in the same format.

Step 2: select the two files and use avconvert to merge them to a single AVI.

Step 3: select the MergedAVI.avi file and use avconvert to convert it to mp4.

- Apr 29 2011
Audio/Video/Image/Text/ISO Convert

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 380 comments

Version 0.90 is ready! - Apr 27 2011
Audio/Video/Image/Text/ISO Convert

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 380 comments

Guten tag!!

Do you mean that you would like to combine multiple source videos into one output video? I have thought about adding that function.

I will post a new version soon.

-- Marc - Apr 26 2011
newrez - Increase Screen Rez For Netbook

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 146 comments

>> (standard_in) 1: syntax error
>> DEFAULT: 1024 600

Hi -- SO sorry for the delay -- gnome-look for some reason is NOT sending me email when new comments arrive...

The above complaint, and the problems that follow, are coming from the lines that "echo" things to the "bc" command. I guess it's possible that Mint's "echo" command is different??

Type this:
echo -e "this is\na test"

You should get no complaints, and the results should print "this is" and "a test" on two separate lines.

Let me know what happens... - Apr 14 2011
newrez - Increase Screen Rez For Netbook

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 146 comments

OOPS -- there should be a pipe symbol (the shifted-backspace | character) between "2>&1" and "tee".

Should read ... 2>&1 | tee ... - Mar 17 2011
newrez - Increase Screen Rez For Netbook

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 146 comments

The problem is definitely at or near the 'bc' commands. I suspect this because not only is the math being done incorrectly, but there are four syntax errors and there are four spots in the script that use 'bc'.

Try running the script with "sh -xv newrez 2>&1 tee /tmp/test.txt"

You'll get copious screen output, showing each line as it is encountered in the script and then a second time after any substitutions as it is executed. The complete output will be saved to /tmp/test.txt which can be reviewed afterwards.

Let me know what you see.

-- Marc - Mar 17 2011
newrez - Increase Screen Rez For Netbook

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 146 comments

Hi! Hope I can help...

The ratios themselves are simply the 'desired' horizontal resolution divided by the 'default' (usually the 'hardware') horizontal resolution. So they ought to be: 1280=1.25 1497=1.46 1600=1.56, etc.

The script simply takes your 'desired' rez, divides it by 'default' to get the ratio, constructs the "xrandr" command line, and puts it into a script and an icon for later use.

Calculation of the ratio depends on the linux program "bc". If the script is producing a "scale" value of "1" for all your shortcuts until you reached 2048 and then jumped to "2", it would seem that the results of dividing 'desired' by 'default' are always producing integer values.

To test this, go to a command prompt and type "bc<enter>". Then type "scale=2<enter>1600/1024<enter>quit<enter>". You should have gotten an answer of "1.56"

Keep me posted...

-- Marc - Mar 16 2011
newrez - Increase Screen Rez For Netbook

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 146 comments

Hi! Hope I can help...

The ratios themselves are simply the 'desired' horizontal resolution divided by the 'default' (usually the 'hardware') horizontal resolution. So they ought to be: 1280=1.25 1497=1.46 1600=1.56, etc.

The script simply takes your 'desired' rez, divides it by 'default' to get the ratio, constructs the "xrandr" command line, and puts it into a script and an icon for later use.

Calculation of the ratio depends on the linux program "bc". If the script is producing a "scale" value of "1" for all your shortcuts until you reached 2048 and then jumped to "2", it would seem that the results of dividing 'desired' by 'default' are always producing integer values.

To test this, go to a command prompt and type "bc<enter>". Then type "scale=2<enter>1600/1024<enter>quit<enter>". You should have gotten an answer of "1.56"

Keep me posted...

-- Marc - Mar 16 2011
newrez - Increase Screen Rez For Netbook

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 146 comments

The newrez script will work with all hardware, including the Nvidia and ATI cards. However, the driver for that card must support "xrandr version 1.3".

Most of the standard drivers on a reasonably recent Linux install do support version 1.3 with the exception of drivers for very old cards.

For the ATI and Nvidia cards, more than one driver is available. In the case of Nvidia, your choices are 'vesa' (low performance). 'nouveau' (good performance with acceleration), and 'nvidia' (a "non-free" driver written by the vendor, and potentially the best performer).

The 'nvidia' driver is installed by many users because it offers the best performance and the most features. However, this driver does NOT support version 1.3 of xrandr. Therefore if you are using the kmod-nvidia package then newrez will not work. Perhaps some day this driver will be updated to support 1.3.

Until then, if one of the other drivers for your card is suitable for your performance needs, then newrez will work fine. - Feb 18 2011
Audio/Video/Image/Text/ISO Convert

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 380 comments

I am glad that worked for you!

You don't actually have to unclick any of the defaults before going to the key-in window.

If you do click on some of the options and then ckick key-in, the key-in window will retain the options you had chosen and you can add more from there.

Lastly, if you key-in an option followed by a comment as in "-ab 128k -b 3000k # my favorite settings", then your option (including both the options you checked and the options you keyed in) will be saved permanently. When you run the program the next time, your own option (with the comment) will be in the list and can be chosen with one click.

In this way you can save as many options as you want. Further, if you create something really useful that you would like to share, send it to me here or via email and I will include it in the "user submissions" download. This is a separate download on this page that includes updates that users have created, and it can be downloaded and installed in your nautilus-scripts folder. Sadly, there has been only one submission out of 45,000 users :-(

So... good to hear you're operational and wanted to pass along how to save your settings.

Cheers!

-- Marc - Jan 25 2011
Audio/Video/Image/Text/ISO Convert

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 380 comments

Interesting... Both the defaults and the options are strictly the behavior of ffmpeg itself. However, I never noticed that changing one parameter from the defaults would affect others.

One approach would be to use the 'key-in options' to create your own selectable checkbox with all the settings you prefer - that would give you a one-click box to make exactly what you want.

I think though, now that this has been brought up, that the script really ought to analyze the input file and set the defaults so that there is no loss. So I will put that on my to-do list. In the meantime, I'd suggest creating your own option. Have you found that feature?

Expect a new version as soon as time permits, and thanks for the feedback.

-- Marc - Jan 25 2011
Audio/Video/Image/Text/ISO Convert

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 380 comments

HI!!

Looking at this command, the "-s 320x" is missing the height to convert to. I have just tested this here on a couple of files and it is working for me.

When converting with the "w-" option, the script finds the ratio of the source-file width and the destination-file width, then applies that to the source-file height. This math is done with the linux program 'bc'. Please make sure that the program 'bc' is installed on your system.

I have added a test for the 'bc' package and will post version 0.88 of the script. Sorry!

Let me know if the problem is fixed!!

-- Marc




...
ffmpeg command as executed:
ffmpeg -y -i 1.mkv -s 320x /media/WinC/Users/Cas/Downloads/1.mpg - Jan 07 2011
newrez - Increase Screen Rez For Netbook

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 146 comments

1: Click the DOWNLOAD button

The file will appear in your $HOME directory, or on your Desktop, or in your Downloads folder, depending on your settings.

Find the file: 134686-newrez.tar.gz

2: THE AUTOMATIC WAY: If this works for your system, double-click that file and "extract" it.
2a: If AUTOMATIC does not work for you:
. open a terminal
. cd to the directory containing the file
. type: gunzip 134686-newrez.tar.gz
. type: tar xvf newrez.tar

You now have a file named: newrez
This is the actual program

3: type: mv newrez $HOME/.gnome2/nautilus-scripts

You are now "installed".

To use the program, right-click your mouse while pointing at the desktop background.
Select "Scripts"
Click on "newrez"

ENJOY!! - Nov 17 2010
newrez - Increase Screen Rez For Netbook

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 146 comments

1: Click the DOWNLOAD button

The file will appear in your $HOME directory, or on your Desktop, or in your Downloads folder, depending on your settings.

Find the file: 134686-newrez.tar.gz

2: THE AUTOMATIC WAY: If this works for your system, double-click that file and "extract" it.
2a: If AUTOMATIC does not work for you:
. open a terminal
. cd to the directory containing the file
. type: gunzip 134686-newrez.tar.gz
. type: tar xvf newrez.tar

You now have a file named: newrez
This is the actual program

3: type: mv newrez $HOME/.gnome2/nautilus-scripts

You are now "installed".

To use the program, right-click your mouse while pointing at the desktop background.
Select "Scripts"
Click on "newrez"

ENJOY!! - Nov 16 2010
newrez - Increase Screen Rez For Netbook

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 146 comments

1: Click the DOWNLOAD button

The file will appear in your $HOME directory, or on your Desktop, or in your Downloads folder, depending on your settings.

Find the file: 134686-newrez.tar.gz

2: THE AUTOMATIC WAY: If this works for your system, double-click that file and "extract" it.
2a: If AUTOMATIC does not work for you:
. open a terminal
. cd to the directory containing the file
. type: gunzip 134686-newrez.tar.gz
. type: tar xvf newrez.tar

You now have a file named: newrez
This is the actual program

3: type: mv newrez $HOME/.gnome2/nautilus-scripts

You are now "installed".

To use the program, right-click your mouse while pointing at the desktop background.
Select "Scripts"
Click on "newrez"

ENJOY!! - Nov 16 2010
newrez - Increase Screen Rez For Netbook

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 146 comments

Hi -- I appreciate the suggestions. Here is WHY I did WHAT I did:

When testing for the xrandr version, I know that 1.1 and 1.2 will not work. I Also know that 1.3 and the current version 1.3.3 do work. And I expect that future versions also work. Your suggestion is reasonable, but the "test" command numerical evaluations are integer-only. I considered taking "1.3" and "the installed version", removing the "."'s. padding both with enough trailing zeroes to be of equal length, and then using the test you describe. It just seemed like more work than necessary.

When looking for the gnome-panel-add binary I found that does not live in $PATH (at least on my Fedora system). Therefore, neither "whereis" nor "which" will can be used. This leaves me with three options: to assume that it is in the same place on all distributions (scary), to hunt it down with "find" (guaranteed to work but slow), or to use "locate" (and assume that the distro is running the "mlocate/updatedb" cron job). I felt it unlikely that there would be another file by that name, but perhaps it WOULD be smart to ensure that exactly one match was found (I will DEFINITELY do that). If you have other ideas for this issue, I'm totally open.

Thanks to your input, I've just found that gnome-panel-add is rather new. On my Fedora 11 system that binary does not exist, but on 12 and newer it does. To further complicate things, on the newer versions (Fedora 14), "gnome-panel --version" returns an error. UGH! I've added code to do some testing to ensure that only one gnome-panel-add exists, that it is a python script, and that it is a new enough version.

I appreciate the input! Try version 0.7

THANKS! - Nov 15 2010
newrez - Increase Screen Rez For Netbook

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 146 comments

HAHA!! It's a deal :-)

You could also check out my "Audio/Video Convert" script -- put a lot of work into that one... - Nov 12 2010
newrez - Increase Screen Rez For Netbook

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 146 comments

Try version 0.5 ;-) - Nov 12 2010
newrez - Increase Screen Rez For Netbook

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 146 comments

That's not where I put it on my system (see above). I suppose it should work there too, but the xinitrc.d directory is there for your "custom stuff" and won't disturb (or be disturbed by) updates.

The line looks right. You could put a very long 'sleep' in there, then look for it with a 'ps' once the system is up.

It's also possible that X isn't up within the 20 seconds, so a long sleep (30 or 40) might be all that's needed.

Of course putting that script somewhere and having Gnome start it at login should work too.

Let me know what happens... - Nov 10 2010
newrez - Increase Screen Rez For Netbook

Nautilus Scripts by marc41 146 comments

Good point. Should I drop them in $HOME? Or maybe even $HOME/Desktop which will make them obvious AND clickable?? *AND* draggable to the launcher!!

What do you think? - Nov 10 2010