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The Ultimate Bashrc File

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150 comments
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Let me see if I can clarify for you. The 'bashrc' file can be an invaluable tool on a Linux machine, and its terminal. Now, before I get to its biggest ability, let me give you a couple quick things. For one, it can 'make pretty' your terminal window. If you want to change the color of the font, or what is said when you open a window, or what info is there, or etc., this can do that. If you want to run various commands upon startup of a terminal window, you can add them on this. If you want it to store/not store various things, you can tweak those settings here.

Now, in regards to the 'bashrc' file's biggest function, basically, a 'bashrc' file is a list of 'keyboard shortcuts' that you can use in the terminal. For instance, instead of having to input an entire line of code to perform a specific command, you can type a single letter, or word, and they trigger preset commands (called aliases and functions (little more fancier/lengthier than aliases)). And in general, people add a few aliases and functions they personally want inside their 'bashrc' files. In mine, though, after a long while of looking at what commands (shortcuts) I wanted in mine, I decided to make one "ultimate' one, not just for myself, but to make it easier for others to have. As such, after a couple of years now, I have amassed quite a few aliases and functions. Personally, I use the entire thing (and some other commands I link to specific scripts and such that are on my computers). For some, they prefer to simply extract whatever shortcuts they desire the most, and put into their 'bashrc' files. Finally, when it comes to this one, I have 17,000 lines of code (ie, a WHOLE LOT of preset aliases and functions). You are welcome to change whatever 'shortcuts' you want, and use all that you want. It comes in extremely handy for longer commands. In addition, I find having a huge file of commands in one place EXTREMELY helpful when I need to do something.

Hope that helps.
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